fratboysegs:

my favorite tweet at the moment

fratboysegs:

my favorite tweet at the moment

(via michelynntires)

ttfkagb:

theywhisper-allforgiven:

strangedayshavefoundme666:

brokenasphyxiation:

zetatauri:

ohnonotthedrill:

ndnickerson:

COLLEGE FIRST.

I love how the Addams Family has ZERO slut-shaming. Like… honey you can dance naked and enslave someone with your womanly charms if you want to, I don’t fucking care, but so help me you’re going to get a college education first.

A+ PARENTING

The Addamses are what every family should aspire to be like (you know; without the dismemberment and electric chairs as play time).  Honestly, have you ever seen more unconditionally loving and supportive parents than Gomez and Morticia?  And not just with the kids, but with each other.  I think what’s especially unique about them is how open they are with everything.  They don’t treat their children like children.  They treat them like they treat everyone else; direct, and to the point. 

It’s creepy how many good examples of parenting and romantic relationships there is in these characters, especially considering they are supposed to be the antithesis of the stereotypical American nuclear family.

bolded the coment ^ cause relevant!

The point of the Addams Family is not that they are weird: it’s that they are unapologetically weird and blissfully happy.

(Source: birlybir, via the-real-sambles)

skookumthesamoyed:

skookumthesamoyed:

Skookum’s had enough of your bullshit

JUST KIDDING HE LOVES YOU!

skookumthesamoyed:

skookumthesamoyed:

Skookum’s had enough of your bullshit

JUST KIDDING HE LOVES YOU!

(via thefrogman)

officialrodarte:

Jenny Lewis wears Rodarte’s Bustier Top with Swarovski, Vest, Shorts, Blazer, and Booties (photo by Autumn de Wilde).

officialrodarte:

Jenny Lewis wears Rodarte’s Bustier Top with Swarovski, Vest, Shorts,
Blazer, and Booties (photo by Autumn de Wilde).

(via jennylewisdaily)

ozthecat:

The best.

ozthecat:

The best.

(via jennylewisdaily)

nprfreshair:

Usually when characters age in movies, they’re covered with makeup and outfitted with prosthetics – or directors use different actors as the character ages. But in the new film Boyhood, none of that is necessary.
The film takes place over the course of 12 years, and it was shot over the course of 12 years. So we watch the actors getting older for real, which gives their characters a sense of authenticity.
Director Richard Linklater told what it was like to cast a 6 year-old boy (Ellar Coltrane) not knowing who he would become: 

"It was a huge leap. I just went with a kid who seemed kind of the most interesting. I liked the way his mind worked — he was a little mysterious and sensitive and very thoughtful. He was cut from no ordinary cloth. He was homeschooled and his parents were artists and I thought, "Well, that’s cool, there’ll be some family support for this undertaking. It will be a fun thing to do in his life."
So I think I had the family support but as far as he goes, you kind of have to admit that your main collaborator here has a really unknown future. But I would have each year to incrementally adjust and maybe go toward who he was becoming. That was sort of the design of the movie.”

Boyhood .gif of Ellar Coltrane via CBC 

nprfreshair:

Usually when characters age in movies, they’re covered with makeup and outfitted with prosthetics – or directors use different actors as the character ages. But in the new film Boyhood, none of that is necessary.

The film takes place over the course of 12 years, and it was shot over the course of 12 years. So we watch the actors getting older for real, which gives their characters a sense of authenticity.

Director Richard Linklater told what it was like to cast a 6 year-old boy (Ellar Coltrane) not knowing who he would become: 

"It was a huge leap. I just went with a kid who seemed kind of the most interesting. I liked the way his mind worked — he was a little mysterious and sensitive and very thoughtful. He was cut from no ordinary cloth. He was homeschooled and his parents were artists and I thought, "Well, that’s cool, there’ll be some family support for this undertaking. It will be a fun thing to do in his life."

So I think I had the family support but as far as he goes, you kind of have to admit that your main collaborator here has a really unknown future. But I would have each year to incrementally adjust and maybe go toward who he was becoming. That was sort of the design of the movie.”

Boyhood .gif of Ellar Coltrane via CBC 

deadchinadoll:

Similarities: “I Saw Her Standing There” vs. “I Love Rock N Roll”

(via britishbeatlemania)

(Source: 80slove, via 814stops)

"

The first time I caught one of my kids playing with their genitals, I said absolutely nothing. I was momentarily paralyzed with indecision. One thing I knew for a fact I did not want to do was to shout, “No!” or “Stop!” What good could that possibly do? Sure, I would be spared the awkwardness of catching my child playing with her genitals on the living room floor, but what kind of lesson is that? To fear or ignore your own vagina?

I thought about it almost constantly for two days, and of course she gave me a second chance to react.

"Sweetie, we don’t play with our vulvas in the living room," I said. Which sounded ridiculous and strange, but nonetheless true. Why is everything with little kids "we" statements? "It’s OK to touch your vulva, but people are private, and it’s a private thing. The only places where you should touch your vulva are in the bathroom or in your bedroom. If you want to play with your vulva, please go to the bedroom."

And she smiled and did, without question, because compartmentalizing where you do certain activities makes sense to little kids.

"

Source

This is an amazing article and I really hope to be similar to this with any children that I have. 

(via foryoursexualinformation)

(via nerdloveandlolz)

nprmusic:

Happy Friday! Here’s a Tiny Desk Concert GIF Wall that you didn’t ask for, but maybe always wanted? — Lars